OCTOBER

OCTOBER

June 25, 2011

Natural Surroundings in a Carolina Cottage!

If we were to build a home in the mountains, which we have often talked about, be it the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, or North Carolina, somewhere along the Blue Ridge Parkway, we are gathering the inspiration for our own style of comfort! Growing up, we took several family camping trips to both places so we have often selected these two states to take our own children on summer retreats. This home known as Cow Rock Cottage features several of the elements that we love!



Reflecting its forested location, this beautiful mountain home is decked out in a variety of natural materials―from rough-hewn cedar siding and poplar-bark shakes to stacked indigenous fieldstone. The exteriors are accented with acorn-brown trimwork and shutters, which further link the home to the encircling woodlands. Other colors, such as the rusty, burnt-umber tone of the corrugated metal roof, give Cow Rock Cottage a slightly aged, weathered effect without diminishing its appearance. The home is infused with the look and feel of farmhouses and barns found throughout southern Appalachia. A mountain home would look beautiful as an aged home that appears to have withstood the passing of time.


Stepping Stone Entry
Randomly placed stepping-stones crafted from local granite lead to the front porch’s wide steps. Hand-hewn posts and railings, along with graceful brackets, are crafted from regionally harvested locustwood to further enhance this cottage’s connection to the land. Local fieldstone clads the porch walls

Simple Board-and-Batten Shutters
Shutters crafted from rough-sawn Western red cedar planks are held together with hand-forged-looking strap hinges. Complete with similar shutter dogs, these operable panels are anything but outdated.

 Poplar-Bark Shakes
The use of poplar-bark shakes is about as ecologically conscious as it gets. Hand-peeled and cut on-site from harvested tulip poplars, this siding choice creates the illusion that the cottage sprouted and grew from the land, just like the surrounding trees.

Western Red Cedar Siding
To prevent the bark shakes from stealing the whole show, vertical, rough-sawn Western red cedar siding adds texture to this already earthy mix of materials. Well-known for its natural resistance to moisture, decay, and insect damage, cedar takes stains and paints with ease.


Stone Porch
Randomly placed stepping-stones crafted from local granite lead to this front porch’s wide steps. Hand-hewn posts and railings, along with graceful brackets, are crafted from regionally harvested locust wood to further enhance this cottage’s connection to the land. Local fieldstone clads the porch walls.

Rusted Metal Roof
Cow Rock Cottage’s roof is crafted from recycled materials to create the look of an old tin roof. Metal can last three times longer than asphalt roofing. Even though it’s rusted, the reflective properties of the metal result in a cooler attic, saving more on energy costs than other options.



Estelle's Grilled Turkey Burgers
1 pound ground turkey
1/2 cup Italian-seasoned breadcrumbs
1 large egg, beaten
1/4 cup finely chopped green bell pepper
1 tablespoon minced dried onion
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons Fresh Herb Marinade
4 hamburger buns
Toppings: spicy mustard, shaved Parmesan cheese

Combine first 7 ingredients. Shape mixture into 4 equal-size patties. Grill, covered with grill lid, over medium-high heat (350° to 400°) 5 to 6 minutes on each side or until no longer pink in center. Grill buns, cut sides down, 2 minutes or until toasted. Serve burgers on buns with Onion Rings and desired toppings.






Estelle's Barbecue Pork Sandwiches
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground pepper
2 (3/4-lb.) pork tenderloins
Vegetable cooking spray
6 whole wheat hamburger buns
6 tablespoons Vidalia Onion Barbecue Sauce

Stir together first 4 ingredients; rub pork tenderloins evenly with seasoning mixture. Lightly coat pork with vegetable cooking spray. Grill, covered with grill lid, over medium-high heat (350° to 400°) 10 to 12 minutes on each side or until a meat thermometer inserted into thickest portions registers 155°. Remove from grill, and let stand 10 minutes. Chop or slice, and serve on hamburger buns. Drizzle each sandwich with 1 Tbsp. Vidalia Onion Barbecue Sauce.

Estelle's Vidalia Onion Barbecue Sauce
1 medium-size sweet onion, finely chopped
1 cup ketchup
2 tablespoons firmly packed brown sugar
 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
 1 tablespoon olive oil
1 garlic clove, minced
 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper

Stir together all ingredients and 1/2 cup water in a large saucepan; bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to low, and simmer, stirring occasionally, 20 minutes.






No comments:

Post a Comment

I so love receiving your thoughts and comments. I also hope you found something that made you smile.